National Public Education
12Aug/170

Equity Versus Improvement in the School System

Recently there have been many articles in the press about how Secretary of Education DeVos will "destroy" the public schools if she is allowed to continue her privatization efforts.  I fully agree with this point of view.  It seems that she is intent on doing away with public education as we know it; replacing it with a private school system. However, this doesn't mean that I think these comments are the best way to address this issue. This approach only deals with half the problem: it points out how her plans are inequitable and unfair, but does nothing to solve the overall problem of how to improve the schools.

The schools do need to be improved.  Don't we all know this?  All the data has been flat for a generation.  No matter how we have tried to improve the schools, through better curriculum, better ways to judge the teachers, smaller schools, better pay, etc., nothing has worked.  Of course there are scattered successes, as I myself have been a part of, but no one would say that we now know how to solve our public school problems.

People try to excuse this by saying we have a diverse population, which makes overall success harder, but, for one, there are other countries, such as Canada, which are quite diverse and educate their entire population well, and, for another, diversity is what we do here in America.  Are we going to solve the problem by becoming less diverse?  Is that the solution we want?  If we are diverse then we have to find a diverse way to educate our children well.  Is there any other way to look at it?

People also argue that our top end, our best students, are doing as well as anyone.  Well, duh.  Everyone's top end is doing reasonably well.  It's the entire American system, though, that we want to fix, not the schools in a few select towns or even states.  The central, average level of education in this country is not improving, and hasn't been for a very long time.  That is a problem.  And that is why, of course, the conservatives have turned to their privatization schemes.  They want to find a way to improve at least some of the schools.

This problem of school improvement, though, is ignored in the liberal criticism of Ms DeVos and her friends. Instead, all the focus is on how unfair her privatization schemes would be to the average, non-wealthy, child.  Everyone wants to stop her efforts because they would destroy the equity inherent in a truly public school system.  Her plans would be unfair, and, in a certain sense, immoral.

All this may well be true, but then what?  Does this mean that we want to go back to the public school system we always had, the one whose problems started this whole discussion?  Is it the status quo that we want to return to?  That "status quo" is the problem!  We can't simply argue that the conservatives are wrong.  We also have to come up with what would be right.

This is why the conservative press is more or less laughing at the criticism of Ms DeVos. Quite rightly they find it amusing that no one on the left seems to have the slightest idea of how to improve the schools in a fully public form.  They realize that this "moral" argument about the fairness of her policies is not the main issue.   They at least have one way to improve the schools. That this method only improves some of the schools is problematic, but this still puts them ahead of the opposing liberal view, which has not way to improve any of the schools.  When the liberals say that their policies will "destroy" public education they agree; the public system is not, in fact, working.  It clearly does need to be changed.  They will continue to take this line of argument until the liberals come up with a plan for how to improve public education and keep it public.

It is not enough, then, to show that the conservative efforts to privatize the public schools would be unfair to the majority of students.  Even it that is true, it just gets us back to square one, the question of how to improve the public schools while keeping them public and equitable.  That question, as I never tire of pointing out, is religiously avoided by all, since it is clear that solving it would involve a major revision of our country, let alone of our school system.  That we are afraid to do that implies that we are never going to solve this problem of the public schools, and that the conservative agenda of privatization is going to succeed.

There is a way to make a working, equitable, public school system that would be fair for everyone, through a national school program.  Everyone knows that this would work. We just have to be brave enough to make such a fundamental change.

 

Peter Dodington

8/12/17

 

 

 

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