National Public Education
15Apr/170

Three Facts About Improving Public Education

Some thoughts about how to improve the schools, boiled down to three facts.

1) It takes money, new money, to bring about improvements to a program.

This is so obvious that people often look right past it in the debate about the schools.  Of course schools deal with complex, hard-to-define issue like "intelligence" or "learning," but that does not mean that the structure of the program that provides those things is also hard to define.  If you want to change something for the better, that means that you have to put some new resources into it, like better ideas or better people.  These things cost money.  If they work, you will get the money back and then some, but at first you have to come up with new sources of funds.

In education, this is hard to see because people often want to just "fix" the schools, not "improve" them.  They want to make them less dysfunctional, or more like they used to be, or more equal.  That's fine, but it's not the same as wanting to improve them. Fixing them might be done by just moving the parts around some, and that might not cost much, and certainly the efforts to equalize them ought to be just a matter of shifting the funds around, not providing more funds.  But if we say, from the start, that what we want is better schools, not just schools that have solved their problems, then we will need more money.

A good defense is important in any sport, but in the end, it won't help much if you don't have an offense.  Let's score some points, one's we have made ourselves, rather than just answering our critics.  To do that we need more funds.

2) Funding has to come from the general public, not just the parents.

There simply aren't enough parents of school-age children to do the job.  Only about a quarter of the tax-paying population has children in school.  If we tried to rely on just their contribution to the schools, the schools would have to be four times worse! (Or the parents would have to pay four times as much, which is about what they do if they switch to a private school.) . Schools funded only by parents, such as a new day-care center, meet in church basements.

Private schools and colleges have known this all along.  They don't rely on just the tuition of the parents, as any alumnus can attest.  They are funded primarily by the rest of the population: wealthy donors, graduates and the government.

Of course there are suburban public schools that rely primarily on parent funding, but they educate a very small percentage of the population.  If we want to improve the entire system, we have to rely on funds from the general public.

3) The general public will not fund improvements unless they can see that these provide a public benefit to them.

Parents get a clear benefit from the education of their children.  They can see how this improves their lives now, and how, in the long run, it will improve their adult lives when they grow up.  That is why they are willing to support the schools.

The rest of the population also gets a benefit from the schools, a public benefit.  By educating our children we lower the amount of crime in our society, lessen disease, create better workers, foster innovations, create better voters, and make a more unified country, to name a few.  All this has been proven over and over.  We don't have public schools because we like government-run programs; we have them because they provide benefits that we can't get any other way.

But, you will say, I don't support my schools because I get a benefit from them; I just support them because I like them.  They are like the United Way or such; something good that I want to support.

But, you see, that will never lead to improvements.  Charity does not work as a way to fund growth.  It is actually a way to keep the status quo.  As you say, "You like them," that is, you like what they are, not what they could be.  Charity in general helps people become better at what they are; not at changing to something different, and better.  If we want to improve the schools we can't treat them as a charity.

If we want to fund improvements we need to show the general public how those improvements benefit them.  No one is going to put up new money, an increase in their educational taxes, unless they can see how that investment will make their own lives better.  We know that better schools do make our own lives better; the problem is how to show this to the taxpayers.

Once we get these three facts straight, and agree that they are valid, we can see why the public schools are not improving.  Our decentralized school system, run by the districts and the states, has no way to demonstrate the public benefit from the schools to the taxpayers.  Those benefits occur outside of these local and state entities, as the graduates move away, and so cannot be tracked and tabulated. The only way to improve the schools, then, is to switch to a national school system.

Peter Dodington

April 15, 2017